ENERGY CONVERSION FROM WASTE IN DENMARK

No such interesting and functional power plant was seen. Denmark's new power station in Copenhagen could be a new location for skiing.

No such interesting and functional power plant was seen. Denmark’s new power station in Copenhagen could be a new location for skiing. In November in Copenhagen, perhaps the greenest ski area in the world, and also the power plant, was opened for paid skiers.

The facility is so safe and clean that designers can make the building mass a new center for social life. The hybrid of a building and a landscape, giant glass and mirrored structure, the façade is a checkerboard pattern that can give the illusion of a green mountain in all directions.

Copenhill, as it is called, has a ski lift and a glass elevator to see how my city waste turns into both electricity and heating for more than 200,000 homes. In 2017, the waste power plant under the name of Amager Bakke was opened. For eight years, Bjarke Ingels came up with an idea to design a power plant that would incorporate mountain sports into its nature.

Ingles says that 97 percent of city residents receive home heating as a by-product of energy generation from an integrated system where electricity, heating and waste disposal are combined in a single process. He also thinks he has become an example that others can look at and say that if Copenhagen can do it, we can do it.

Although there are no hills in this island town, residents can now ski and snowboard locally. They can also enjoy the best views of the harbor. Another thing missing is the snow cover in winter. Therefore, designers have built a specially coated plastic lawn that provides excellent friction for downhill winter sports.

600,000 skiers don’t have to travel all the time to do this. In fact, they also create an interesting tourism opportunity.

Visitors can relax in the bar and restaurant at the top of the building, or do cardio tracking on steep walking and jogging tracks. In addition, the longest climbing wall in the world is 85 meters (270 feet) high, designed like a drooping, white-edged and icy mountain (for certified climbers only).

According to the Good News Network, the $ 660 million power plant will process 440,000 tons of waste annually using furnaces, turbines and steam. The electricity it generates can heat up to 160,000 homes and provide electricity to 60,000 people. Although these figures are impressive, only two engineers can observe the 24-hour operation of the entire plant.

Developers hope that 300,000 visitors annually will be delighted with CopenHill’s multi-purpose experience. The ski slope costs $ 22 an hour and the entire season costs only $ 366.

In addition, the city is rising with sure steps in its claim to be the first carbon-neutral city in the world by 2025.

SHARE