VANILLA SCENT

There are scents that fascinate us.

VANILLA SCENT

 

There are scents that fascinate us. The smells that attract us that we can’t stand. While walking on the streets, the smell of fresh bread, the smell of coffee or cake, and sometimes the smell of earth attracts us.

Odor is any of the chemical substances felt by the sense of smell, usually dissolved in the air in very small concentrations. The terms Fragrens and aroma are often used by the cosmetics and food industries to describe pleasant fragrances. The sense of smell shows purely personal characteristics; In addition, the reaction to odor varies depending on reasons such as gender, age, health status. Smells that people are accustomed to, such as their own body odors, are perceived less often than other odors that come from outside and are not accustomed to.

 

 

Whether we feel the scent of vanilla in a cake, a coffee or a perfume, it gives us happiness. Scientists from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland announced that they have discovered a way to turn used plastic waste into vanilla flavor through a genetically modified bacteria. Commenting on the study, which they describe as a new method to combat the global plastic waste crisis, scientist Joanna Sadler said, “This study is the first example of using a biological system to transform plastic waste into a valuable product.”

In the study, it was stated that plastics lose 95 percent of their value when used once, while it was reported that producing more valuable materials from waste could help fight plastic pollution. In the University of Edinburgh study, researchers used Escherichia Coli, a microorganism designed to biologically convert polyethylene terephthalate polymer (PET) plastics to vanillin, which is widely used in multiple industries.

 

In the research published in the journal Green Chemistry, it was stated that Escherichia Coli, which is in the formulation of food and cosmetic products as well as herbicides, antifoam agents and cleaning products, has a mild reaction in the process of converting plastic to vanillin, but does not produce hazardous waste. “This work is the first example of using a biological system to turn plastic waste into a valuable product,” said study scientist Joanna Sadler. “It has very exciting implications for the circular economy.”

“Our work challenges the perception that plastic is a problematic waste,” said Stephen Wallace, the lead researcher, and said. Global demand for vanillin exceeds 37,000 tonnes and is expected to reach an industry value of over half a billion euros by 2025.

How fantastic would it be if the scent of vanilla shook industries and entire cities? Are we tired of this smell? I do not think so!

 

 

BAS PEDALA

There are scents that fascinate us.

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